Charitable Works: Cyclists raise money for non-profit that sends used bicycles to Africa

I had the pleasure of photographing Jakari Griffith last week and was informed that he was taking on quite a venture – a 1,300 mile bike tour to raise money for a worthy cause.

Please take a moment to read the Press Release below. It explains the endeavor and offering the opportunity to track the tour as well as contribute to the cause.

Believe — Then just do it!

-Andria

photographer | memory engraver

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Andria Lavine Photography - portrait - Jakari Griffith-2 photo

(Nanuet, NY, May 23, 2013)—Starting June 4th  8:00 am, Bikes Not Bombs, located in Boston, MA will receive a helping hand from two cycling enthusiasts, Jakari Griffith of Salem, Massachusetts, and Kevan Malone of Manhattan, who are riding on a self-supported trip from New York City to St. Augustine, FL to raise funds for the organization’s expanding international program. 

The cyclists, both natives of Rockland County, NY, began bike touring together in 2010. They have accumulated a combined riding mileage of over 20,000 miles in 3 years. The men have recently integrated their passion for bicycle touring with causes that promote bicycle advocacy and outreach. Griffith, who is a Professor of business management at Bridgewater State University, explains, “The bicycle is one of the most important drivers of economic and social change in emerging contexts…. it has also caused considerable change in the infrastructure of major cities in the U.S. as more millennials move away from cars.” Malone, who holds a master’s degree in American Studies from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and is now planning to pursue a PhD in history, believes in “promoting bicycles as a viable urban transportation alternative that could simultaneously reduce oil dependency, decrease harmful carbon emissions, and make cities safer and more livable.”

The cyclists will begin their ride on the New York side of the George Washington Bridge, and follow a route that will take them through coastal cities of Virginia’s Eastern Shore, North Carolina’s Outer Banks, and Savannah, GA, en route to their final destination, St. Augustine, FL. The men will ride unassisted, relying only on camping equipment packed onto their Surly brand bicycles. The riders expect to cover approximately 70-100 miles a day and complete 1300 miles once they’ve reach their destination.

Malone said, “By providing mobility to people who have historically lacked this ability, Bikes Not Bombs is providing opportunities for economic mobility.” Since 1984, Bikes Not Bombs has shipped over 50,000 bicycles to partners in over 13 countries with a mission of using bicycles for social change. The cyclists became inspired to help the organization after volunteering to repurpose donated bicycles at their reclamation center in Jamaica Plain, MA. Griffith says of his volunteer experience “I was blown away by the dedication of the volunteers and staff…. they’ve been a catalyst for placing bicycles at the center of social and economic change.” The men decided to embark on a fundraising effort to support the organizations international efforts and related youth programs.

One hundred percent of the proceeds raised by the Tour will go to Bikes Not Bombs. Tax deductible donations can be made by visiting the following webpage: https://bikesnotbombs.org/civicrm/pcp/info?reset=1&id=1804

For more information about this tour or the riders, please contact:

Jakari Griffith at jakarigriffith@gmail.com , or twitter @jakarigriffith , or track my tour http://trackmytour.com/cBg9Q

Kevan Malone at kevanqmalone@gmail.com

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